Stand Up Straight! How Good Posture Improves Your Health

by | Mar 1, 2017 | Balance and Flexibility, Building Healthy Habits | 2 comments

Good posture makes us look taller, although, we often lose stature as we get older. On the other hand, poor posture often results from a weak core. A point often overlooked, weak core muscles contribute to slouching. More importantly, strong core muscles lessen wear and tear on the spine and allow you to breathe deeply.

You might not notice these actions: putting on shoes, picking up a package, or turning to look behind you, until they become difficult or painful. Additional core-centric activities include acts that spring from, or pass through, the core: lifting, twisting, carrying, hammering, reaching overhead — even vacuuming, mopping, and dusting.

Interestingly, when you improve your posture, you strengthen your abdominal muscles. Moreover, you enhance your balance and stability. And that prevents falls and injuries. At the same time, with good posture, you look more confident. In fact, a strong, flexible core supports almost everything you do.

 

What is your Core and “Core Strength?”

See this article: How to Increase Core Strength by Improving Your Breathing

 

Don’t Slouch! The Power of Good Posture

The muscles in your abdomen and lower back stabilize your pelvis and spine. Significantly, standing correctly affects the quality of your workouts, your energy, and even your ability to burn fat.

To begin with, practicing good posture will strengthen your abdominal muscles and build low back stability. With this in mind, when these muscles are weak, you’re far more apt to slouch.

Good posture has many benefits. First, it aligns your body, and it speeds up your metabolism (burn up to 350 calories a day). Additionally, it increases your height (you can lose 2 inches by slouching). At the same time improves your mood, and reduces pain (by using your muscles to support your skeleton). (DontSlouchGoodPosture)

 

Assess Your Posture

It’s easy to evaluate your posture:

  1. Start with form-fitting clothes bare feet.
  2. Second, stand sideways in front of a mirror,
  3. Then, close your eyes and march slowly in place a few times.
  4. Finally, look at yourself without adjusting your body position.

Are your shoulders rounded forward or erect? Does your head lean forward or backward? Is your belly extended? (CarlyRowenaPostureStory)

 

How to Improve Your Posture

Proper posture includes alignment, balance, and alignment. As an illustration, you’ll see that your ears are over your shoulders, your rib cage is over your hips, and your hips are over your heels.,

You’ll see immediate improvements in your posture by practicing the following two, simple exercises. Surprisingly, all you need to do them is a wall. On the positive side, these exercises ease pain and achiness that results from poor posture.

  • To begin, stand with your back to a wall.
  • Following that, tuck your chin to your chest, and lean back so the back of your head touches the wall. Equally important, place a pillow behind your head and the wall if it doesn’t move all the way back.
  • Finally, tuck your chin down, and place your hands palm facing down.
  1. First, flap your arms from your sides to just above shoulder level. Repeat that 10 times.
  2. Next, lift your arms to shoulder level, bend your elbows, and put your hands on your ears. Repeat that 10 times. (FixPosture3SimpleExercises)

 

In-Home Personal Training in Manhattan

My name is Jacqueline Gikow. Every week I publish an article about health (getting active and fit), or wellness (enriching your life). Everyone’s journey starts somewhere.

To begin with, I understand bodies, and how to support people who may not like working out. Most compelling, I make it easier for you move from a reluctant to eager exerciser. Accordingly, you can do this without joining a gym (unless you want to).

Contact me through Audacious-Aging.NYC®, to get started with my in-home, or aquatic, personal training programs.

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